How to Investigate Like Jim Rockford [VIDEO]

The Rockford Files may have been a fictional TV series set in the 70s about the private eye, Jim Rockford, but it was dang good. One of the most popular shows of that era.

And, even though it aired before my time (I’m an 80s kid), there are some truth bombs about the P.I. industry that still hold water today.

Watch the video below to get my take on this 70s modern detective.

And, if you enjoyed that video, check out the last video in the “How to Investigate Like” series with COLUMBO (click here)

By the way, I love this show. I actually did not grow up on this show. For me, I loved the show the moment I heard the theme song. It’s awesome. In the handful of episodes I’ve watched, this show is a great time capsule.

Back in a time was when computers and social media weren’t a thing, you had to look “private detective” up in the Yellow Pages and make a phone call to him or visit him in person.

As soon as you start watching the show, you immediately fall into a time warp back to the 70s.

Good for Surveillance Purposes, Creepy for People With Suspicious Landlords.

No lens? No problem with Flat Cam. Surveillance in microform.

The reason your camera currently can’t hide in a business card or why they look awkward in the frame of those surveillance spy glasses is because of lenses.  Those lenses, no matter how small we make a camera, tend to take up a good chunk of space such that, even if the camera is hidden, it has to hide in something with at least a little bulk to it.  Or it used to, anyway.

Engineers from Rice University are taking inspiration from ancient pinhole cameras to design a new kind of camera that’s basically paper-flat and devoid of a lens.  Like a pinhole camera, it uses a hole to let in light. Unlike a pinhole camera, and to make better use of light, it has millions of holes.  A little computer science allows the camera to reconstruct one solid image from the many images let in by the numerous holes and voila, you have a functional camera that’s super thin.  So thin, in fact, you could paper an entire wall with them and have access to viewing an entire room.

A flat camera that you can basically manipulate like paper could have dozens of applications; secret body and dash cams, easily hidden security cameras virtually everywhere.  You could up the ante on the GoPro market by being able to use the cameras in far more extreme conditions, or in much crazier places.  Want to see where pizza rat is taking his meal?  Pop a paper cam on it. Or put one on a helium balloon and let it loose in a storm. Imagine the surveillance possibilities.

If you could roll out cameras like you roll out tape or paper, what could you do with them?